Results for Tag: Yarmouk River

7 results found.
Jordan

Internationally, a water availability below 1,000 m3 per person per year is defined as water scarcity, while below 500 m3 is considered “absolute scarcity”. Jordan’s lack of water resources impacts the country’s economic growth, political stability and national security, but also public health.

GroundWater
The two primary groundwater resources in Israel are the Coastal and Mountain Aquifers. These aquifers are also the main water resources for Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank respectively. There are also a number of smaller aquifers in the Negev Desert and Arava Valley.[1] Coastal Aquifer The Coastal Aquifer stretches from the Carmel Range [...]
Further Reading
1 - Yorke, V., 2013. ‘Politics matter: Jordan's path to water security lies through political reforms and regional cooperation’. 2 - UN-ESCWA & BGR, 2013. Jordan River. In: Inventory of Shared Water Resources in Western Asia, Beirut. 3- EDM Global, 2015. Every drop matters. See everydropmatters.com/global-edm/jordan/ for project overview. 4 - Al-Ansari, N. et al., [...]
Shared Water Resources

Shifting regional relationships have affected Jordan’s access to these shared resources throughout the country’s history. In several cases, Jordan has received less than its equitable share of the resource, as upstream neighbours overexploit rivers and groundwater sources through damming, diversions and pumping.

Surface and Groundwater

Given the issues discussed above regarding the amount, reliability and quality of surface water sources, the Jordanian population relies mainly on groundwater for its domestic water supply.

Shared Water Resources

Almost all of Israel’s natural surface and groundwater resources are shared with neighbouring countries, except for the Kishon River, which is so heavily polluted that it is no longer suitable for use.

Surface Water

Part of the river’s watershed extends eastward into the West Bank. The river’s water level and quality have been deteriorating since 1955 . . .