Results for Tag: Water Infrastructure

24 results found.
Water Infrastructure in Sudan

Dams are the major Water infrastructure in Sudan .There are six dams across the Nile in the Sudan. These are:

• Sennar on the Blue Nile. Built in 1925 (capacity 0.07BCM);
• Jebel Awlia on the White Nile. Built in 1937 (capacity 3.0BCM);
• Khashm al-Girba on the Atbara. Built in 1964 (capacity 0.8BCM);
• Roseires Dam on the Blue Nile. Built in 1966 (heightened in 2014, capacity 7.0BCM);
• Merowe Dam on the Nile. Built in 2009 (capacity 12.0BCM);
• The Atbara/Setit Dam C

Water Infrastructure in Iran

Dams have always played an important role in harnessing precious Iranian water reserves, and the long-term objective of Iran’s water resources development plan is based on the control and regulation of water through dams. In 2015, a total of 647 dams were in operation, of which 352 are considered significant reservoirs, with a total capacity of 48.39BCM.

Iraq

Sustainable water resource management in Iraq has no shortage of challenges. Some of Iraq’s water hardships, like seasonal floods and droughts, occur naturally. Many of the most disruptive and destructive problems are, however, man-made: water infrastructure debilitated from decades of war and neglect; inefficient and outdated agricultural practices; rapid population growth and urbanization; competing water management approaches within transboundary river systems; and the looming crisis of climate change. The government of Iraq has plans to address the situation but it remains to be seen whether major reform will transpire.

Water Infrastructure in Iraq

Iraq’s extensive reservoir network is at the heart of the country’s ability to manage its available water resources. The dams are operated in three independent systems: System No. 1 encompassing the Euphrates, Tigris, Greater Zab and Lesser Zab; System No. 2 encompassing the al-Adhaim watershed; and System No. 3 encompassing the Diyala watershed.

What Does the Future Hold for Water in Iraq?

The Ministry of Water Resources has shown that it understands the challenges that face the country and has adopted a strategy that will help alleviate water scarcity in the future. Despite this, several crises threaten to push the country towards further deterioration. Failing infrastructure, outdated agricultural and irrigation systems, upstream development, the IS insurgency, budget shortfalls, political instability and climate change all require discreet solutions, any one of which is difficult on its own let alone in tandem.

Water Infrastructure in Turkey

Between 1950 and 1965, open irrigation canals were constructed in Turkey. Irrigation systems with canalettes have been introduced since 1965. Irrigation systems with canallettes were constructed between 1970 and 1980. By 1990, low and medium pipe network with advanced pipe technologies have been used.

Water Use

Groundwater and surface water account for respectively 51% and 49% of total water supply in Lebanon. Most of the surface water supply originates from spring sources, with 637 MCM/yr currently exploited.

Water Infrastructure

In 2012, the Water Authority published a master plan outlining a strategy to ensure water availability until 2050. While total water use is expected to rise from 2,131 MCM in 2010 to 3,571 MCM in 2050

Lebanon

Lebanon is naturally water rich compared to other countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. However, much of this water flows to the sea unused due to inefficient use and poorly maintained or absent infrastructure.

Why is There a Water Crisis in Gaza?

In 1997, the World Bank described the water situation in Gaza as an “emergency state of affairs”. Yet nearly 20 years on, the levels of pumping have only increased, pollution has worsened and large parts of the water infrastructure in the area have been damaged or destroyed. Why was Gaza’s “emergency state of affairs” left to deteriorate beyond the point of repair?