Results for Tag: Ministry

49 results found.
Water Uses in Iraq

Agricultural water uses in Iraq are the the vast majority among the other sectors. Municipal and industrial needs are tied for second place

Water Infrastructure in Iraq

Iraq’s extensive reservoir network is at the heart of the country’s ability to manage its available water resources. The dams are operated in three independent systems: System No. 1 encompassing the Euphrates, Tigris, Greater Zab and Lesser Zab; System No. 2 encompassing the al-Adhaim watershed; and System No. 3 encompassing the Diyala watershed.

Iraq’s Shared Water Resources

Bilateral and tripartite meetings have taken place between Turkey, Iraq and Syria since the mid-1960s. Despite the various attempts to negotiate a water-sharing agreement, the three riparians have disagreed on the division of water quantities and embarked upon individual water sector projects.

Water Management and Water Challenges in Iraq

The Ministry of Water Resources has adopted a strategy on water resource management to address water needs and to overcome water challenges in Iraq. If the strategy is fully implemented, there is projected to be a 24.5% decrease in the freshwater consumption between now and 2035, even as Iraq’s population grows.

What Does the Future Hold for Water in Iraq?

The Ministry of Water Resources has shown that it understands the challenges that face the country and has adopted a strategy that will help alleviate water scarcity in the future. Despite this, several crises threaten to push the country towards further deterioration. Failing infrastructure, outdated agricultural and irrigation systems, upstream development, the IS insurgency, budget shortfalls, political instability and climate change all require discreet solutions, any one of which is difficult on its own let alone in tandem.

Water Challenges of Turkey

Uncontrolled use of groundwater resources in the regions with insufficient amount of surface water (rivers and lakes) stands out as another challenge. Use of illegal wells for groundwater extraction is a major issue. Despite the legal regulations on wells, the problem related to illegal wells cannot be solved because of the inadequate sanctions and inspection. The groundwater resources are subject to intense use for agriculture purpose. Because of over-extraction, most of the groundwater resources are under the threat of extinction.

Water Management in Turkey

The discussions about the creation of a ministry related to the water resources have continued for a long time and took its final form in 2011 under the name of the Ministry of Forestry and Water Affairs.This ministry is responsible for the development of policies related to the protection of water resources and their sustainable use, and the coordination of the national water management.

Water Infrastructure in Turkey

Between 1950 and 1965, open irrigation canals were constructed in Turkey. Irrigation systems with canalettes have been introduced since 1965. Irrigation systems with canallettes were constructed between 1970 and 1980. By 1990, low and medium pipe network with advanced pipe technologies have been used.

What Does the Future Hold for Water in Turkey?

It is essential to take immediate measures to prevent potential water shortage. Thus, demand-oriented management should be the focus rather than supply-oriented management. Demand-oriented management is provided by efficiently using water resources through limiting demand on water, and setting institutional, economic and administrative incentives to save water. It is essential for water resources management to be flexible and effective enough to adapt to changing climate conditions, dry spells, and new precipitation patterns.

Availability and Use of Water Resources in Turkey

According to the Falkenmark Index, which classifies countries in terms of their amount of water potential per capita, Turkey is a country with “water stress,” since it has 1,000-1,500 cubic meters of water potential per capita.