Results for Tag: Mediterranean Sea

19 results found.
How Does the Water Crisis Impact Life in Gaza?

Gaza’s water crisis affects every one of the territory’s 1.76 million inhabitants. The heavy pollution of water resources in the Gaza Strip has a severe impact on public health; children are particularly at risk from water-related diseases. In addition, the local economy, agricultural production in particular, and the environment suffer the consequences of the water scarcity and pollution.

Shared Water Resources

Developed in consultation with the Syrian government, the Assi scheme aims to develop water resources in the basin for irrigation, domestic use and hydropower.

Nahr el Kabir River & more

Lebanon has announced the construction of the dam via the United Nations as per the UN Convention on the Law of the Non-Navigational Uses of International Watercourses (to which Israel is not a signatory), which stipulates that signatories must give “prior notification of planned measures”. The plan is currently pending.

Geography, Climate, and Population

Israel’s population has grown from an estimated 806,000 inhabitants in 1948 to around 7.73 million people in 2013 – an increase of more than 800% in 67 years.

Challenges

Policy, innovation and management have helped the country address and in some cases overcome some of these challenges.

GroundWater
The two primary groundwater resources in Israel are the Coastal and Mountain Aquifers. These aquifers are also the main water resources for Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank respectively. There are also a number of smaller aquifers in the Negev Desert and Arava Valley.[1] Coastal Aquifer The Coastal Aquifer stretches from the Carmel Range [...]
Lebanon

Lebanon is naturally water rich compared to other countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. However, much of this water flows to the sea unused due to inefficient use and poorly maintained or absent infrastructure.

Why is There a Water Crisis in Gaza?

In 1997, the World Bank described the water situation in Gaza as an “emergency state of affairs”. Yet nearly 20 years on, the levels of pumping have only increased, pollution has worsened and large parts of the water infrastructure in the area have been damaged or destroyed. Why was Gaza’s “emergency state of affairs” left to deteriorate beyond the point of repair?

Gaza’s Water Crisis

The Gaza Strip has been facing a steadily worsening water crisis for the past decade. Overall, more than 96% of water in the Gaza Strip is unfit for human use.