Results for Tag: Gaza Strip

22 results found.
Limitations on Developing Infrastructure in Gaza

Sanitation services and water infrastructure in Gaza are in a critical state. A 2009 World Bank report stated that Gaza has a well-designed master plan for water and sanitation services. The plan identifies the need to build three new treatment plants as well as significantly expand wastewater treatment capacity. However, the same report indicated that under current closure conditions and with a deteriorating political and security situation, less than 2% of the investment programme was being implemented.

Agricultural Water Use in the West Bank and Gaza

Agriculture is considered highly important to the Palestinian economy, as it makes up 25% of exports and directly employs around 117,000 Palestinians. However, agriculture contributes only about 12% to Palestinian GDP, while continuing to be the largest consumer of water, accounting for more than 62% of total use according to the World Bank. The amount of water currently used for irrigation is about 141 MCM/yr to irrigate around 200,000 dunum (1 dunum is about 0.1 hectare) in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

Domestic Water Use in the Gaza Strip

In the Gaza Strip, where there is a greater water supply in theory, the majority of wells (80%) only work partially and the rest not at all. In 2006, almost half of Gazan households bought their water, either bottled or from tanker trucks, because tap water was too salty to drink. Daily consumption is approximately 90 litres per person (2013/2014). Moreover, the quality of water delivered by the municipality exceeds maximum standards for contaminants and is largely unfit for human consumption …

Gaza

The dramatic deterioration of water quality in Gaza poses a grave public health threat and forms a major challenge for the Palestinian water sector. Gaza’s groundwater has become saline following years of over-exploitation of the Coastal Aquifer. Inflow of saline water is both a result of seawater intrusion and of lateral inflow from Israel …

Palestine

The water situation in Palestine (the West Bank and Gaza Strip) is dire. Characterized by a shortage of supply, restricted access and poor quality, it affects the quality of life, health and economic situation of every Palestinian. The water crisis in Palestine is caused not only by the area’s aridity and current agricultural practices. A difficult situation has been made worse by Israeli occupation policies and practices, which prevent Palestinians from controlling their own water resources.

Water Resources

All surface and groundwater resources in Palestine are shared with Israel and/or other states. Surface water sources are scarce, and include the Jordan River and a number of wadis (stream beds or ravines where water only flows seasonally and temporarily, often as flash floods after thunderstorms).

Climate and Rainfall

The West Bank experiences significant climatic variation within a very small area. It lies within the Mediterranean climatic zone, which is characterized by winter rain and summer drought. Only the Lower Jordan Valley has a different transitional climate, between dry steppe and the extreme desert conditions of the Dead Sea region. Rainfall is limited to the winter and spring months, mostly between October and April.

Geography and Population of Palestine

Palestine is divided into two physically separated areas known as the West Bank (including East Jerusalem) and the Gaza Strip, with areas of 5,661 km and 365 km respectively. In 2012, the average population density was 456 inhabitants/km² in the West Bank and 4,353 inhabitants/km² in the Gaza Strip …

Political Context

The water crisis in Palestine cannot be presented in isolation from the political context, which continues to affect the economy, population, resource distribution and land ownership in the territories. However, because of the complexity of the issues and the limited scope of this report, the events that have impacted the water situation are only briefly discussed on this page …

Gaza Strip Residents Face Daily Struggle for Water

The Gaza Strip is one of the most densely populated areas in the world, with an estimated 4,500 inhabitants per square kilometre. The population has increased more than 20 times since 1948