Results for Tag: Aqaba

10 results found.
Shared Water Resources

Shifting regional relationships have affected Jordan’s access to these shared resources throughout the country’s history. In several cases, Jordan has received less than its equitable share of the resource, as upstream neighbours overexploit rivers and groundwater sources through damming, diversions and pumping.

Water Management

The Water Authority of Jordan has developed a policy to allow private initiative in the water sector in the form of private water companies and public-private partnerships.

Current and Planned Infrastructural Projects

After the peace treaty in 1994, the implementation of a canal linking the Red Sea and the Dead Sea became the focal point of Israeli-Jordanian cooperation. In February 2015, Jordan and Israel signed an agreement to implement the first phase of the project at a cost of $900 million over a period of three years.

High and Dry with the Hashemites

With much of its land an arid, inhospitable desert, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, one of the world’s driest countries, threatens to die of thirst. Analysts have long warned that Jordan, saddled with shrinking renewable resources and a quickly growing population, faced a reckoning. In recent years, however, the challenges confronting this parched kingdom have accelerated.

Q&A with Professor Elias Salameh of the University of Jordan

Fanack Water speaks to Professor Elias Salameh of the University of Jordan about possible solutions to Jordan’s water crisis Jordan is confronting growing challenges when it comes to water resources management. Can you put the country’s water crisis in context for our readers? Historically, Jordan is a naturally water-scarce country. It lies in a semi-arid […]

Project Costs, Management and Alternatives

The cost of the falling level of the Dead Sea has been estimated at $73-227 million/yr. The cost of producing potable water at Aqaba and transferring it to Amman is estimated at $2/m3, considerably higher than the cost of water produced through the RSDS Project (<$1.5/m3).

Description of the Recommended Option

The recommended optimum solution is a pipeline for the transfer of 2,000MCM/yr of water from the Red Sea. The intake consists of a submerged pipe off the eastern shore of the Gulf of Aqaba. More research is required to determine the optimal depth of the intake (between 25 and 140m). Fourteen pumps, each with a […]

Outcome of the Feasibility Study

The feasibility study was carried out under the auspices of the World Bank by the engineering consultancy Coyne and Bellier. According to the terms of reference, three scenarios were examined: The mass balance of Dead Sea water was established for the year 2010, as illustrated in the diagram below. It shows that the net water loss […]

Geographic Setting and Natural Conditions

The Dead Sea is part of the Jordan Rift Valley (JRV), which extends from Lake Tiberias in the north to the Gulf of Aqaba in the south. The bottom of the Dead Sea is, at 790 metres below sea level (m bsl), the lowest point in this valley and the shoreline, at about 420m bsl, is the lowest land surface on earth.

Red Sea-Dead Sea Project

The catchment of the Dead Sea covers approximately 42,000km2, stretching from southern Lebanon to the Sinai Peninsula in Egypt (see map below, the area bordered in white). All rainfall in this area that is not evaporated or extracted for use elsewhere accumulates in the Dead Sea, a low-lying saline lake. Because the catchment of the […]